Winner Announcement – German Literature Month Giveaways – Late Fame and A Bell for Ursli

german-literature-month-vi

comparison

It’s Monday and I’m happy to announce the winners of my giveaway.

The winner of Arthur Schnitzler’s Late Fame is Jonathan.

The winner of A Bell for Ursli is Travellin’ Penguin.

Congratulations to both of you.

Please send me your address via email

beautyisasleepingcat at gmail dot com

 

German Literature Month Giveaways – Late Fame by Arthur Schnitzler and A Bell For Ursli by Selina Chönz

german-literature-month-vi

Today I’m giving away two very different books. 

a-bell-for-ursli

The first book is the miniature edition of one of the most famous Swiss picture books A Bell for Ursli.

“A Bell for Ursli” is a classic Swiss children’s story, with pictures by award-winning Swiss illustrator Alois Carigiet. Ursli is a little boy who lives in the Swiss Alps. He must find a big cowbell so that he can lead the spring procession through his village, so he goes alone to his family’s chalet high up in the mountains. There, he spends a lonely, scary night. Generations of Swiss children have grown up with Ursli but this is the first time his adventures have been widely available in English.

 

late-fame

The second book I’m giving away is Arthur Schnitzler’s Late Fame.

Here’s what is written on Pushkin Press’ site:

First English publication of a recently rediscovered novella by one of the greatest European writers

One seemingly ordinary evening, Eduard Saxberger arrives home to find the fulfilment of a long-forgotten wish in his sitting room: a visitor has come to tell him that the youth of Vienna have discovered his poetic genius. Saxberger has written nothing for thirty years, yet he now realises that he is more than merely an Unremarkable Civil Servant, after all: a Venerable Poet, for whom Late Fame is inevitable – if, that is, his new acolytes are to be believed…

Arthur Schnitzler was one of the most admired, provocative European writers of the twentieth century. The Nazis attempted to burn all of his work, but his archive was miraculously saved, and with it, Late Fame. Never published before, it is a treasure, a perfect satire of literary self-regard and charlatanism.

*******

If you would like to win a copy of one of these books, please leave a comment. The only thing you have to do is to tell me why you’d like to win this book.

Please be aware that the picture book is tiny. To give you an idea, I took a photo together with the second book I’m giving away.

comparison

 

The giveaways is open internationally. I’ll announce the winners on Monday 21 November 17:00 – Western European time.

 

German Literature Month Giveaway – Montaigne by Stefan Zweig

german-literature-month-vi

 

As promised, here’s the first of this year’s German Literature Month giveaway’s.

zweigs-montaigne

I’m giving away the Pushkin Press edition of Austrian author Stefan Zweig’s Montaigne. While Zweig has written short stories, novellas, and novels, he also wrote a great many essays and biographies. Montaigne isn’t his most famous but that doesn’t mean it’s not a very interesting book. The topic certainly is.

Here’s what the blurb has to say:

Stefan Zweig was already an émigré-driven from a Europe torn apart by brutality and totalitarianism-when he found, in a damp cellar, a copy of Michel de Montaigne’s Essais. Montaigne would become Zweig’s last great occupation, helping him make sense of his own life and his obsessions-with personal freedom, with the sanctity of the individual. Through his writings on suicide, he would also, finally, lead Zweig to his death.

With the intense psychological acuity and elegant prose so characteristic of Zweig’s fiction, this account of Montaigne’s life asks how we ought to think, and how to live. It is an intense and wonderful insight into both subject and biographer.

*******

If you would like to win a copy of Zweig’s Montaigne, please leave a comment. The only thing you have to do is to tell me why you’d like to win this book.

The giveaways is open internationally. I’ll announce the winners on Monday 7 November 17:00 – Western European time.

THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED

Christa Wolf Giveaway – The Winners

literatur_2015_gold-2

One day left before  German Literature Month begins.

High time to announce the winners of Christa Wolf’s August – offered by Seagull Books.

And the winners are:

TJ @ MyBookStrings

Melissa Beck

Congratulations! And happy reading, TJ and Melissa.

Please send me your address via beautyisasleepingcat at gmail dot com. Lizzy will be sending your copies.

 

Wednesdays Are Wunderbar – German Literature Month Giveaway – August by Christa Wolf

literatur_2015_gold-2

It’s Wednesday again and you already know what that means. We’re hosting a giveaway. This week’s copies are from Seagull Books (University of Chicago Press).

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 17.02.56

For this year’s German Literature Month I have the opportunity to give away two copies of Christa Wolf’s August, translated by Katy Derbyshire. Since I’m hosting a Christa Wolf week this year, I’m particularly pleased about this giveaway.

Christa Wolf Week

Here’s what the editor writes about August:

Christa Wolf was arguably the best-known and most influential writer in former East Germany. Having grown up during the Nazi regime, she and her family were forced to flee their home like many others, nearly starving to death in the process. Her earliest novels were controversial because they contained veiled criticisms of the Communist regime which landed her on government watch lists. Her past continued to permeate her work and her life, as she said, “You can only fight sorrow when you look it in the eye.”

August is Christa Wolf’s last piece of fiction, written in a single sitting as an anniversary gift to her husband. In it, she revisits her stay at a tuberculosis hospital in the winter of 1946, a real life event that was the inspiration for the closing scenes of her 1976 novel Patterns of Childhood. This time, however, her fictional perspective is very different. The story unfolds through the eyes of August, a young patient who has lost both his parents to the war. He adores an older girl, Lilo, a rebellious teenager who controls the wards. Sixty years later, August reflects on his life and the things that she taught him.

Written in taut, affectionate prose, August offers a new entry into Christa Wolf’s work and, incidentally, her first and only male protagonist. More than a literary artifact, this new novel is a perfectly constructed story of a quiet life well lived. For both August and Christa Wolf, the past never dies.

*******
If you are interested in winning this book, leave a comment, telling me why you’d like to read it.

The competition is open internationally. The winner will be announced on Saturday October 31 2015, around 18:00 Central European time.