Berlin Alexanderplatz Readalong – Part 4

Berlin Alexanderplatz Readalong Part 3 – “Chapters” 8/9

 

  1. Reinhold is possibly the biggest villain in the story. Would you agree? Do you find his punishment satisfying?

 

I found him the biggest villain because he seems so harmless at first. Almost helpless. He really tricked Franz, making him help him, trusting him. But even without that, the Mieze story shows his cruelty and viciousness and then, on top of everything else, trying to frame his “friend” shows the extent of his depravity. In light of this, no, I don’t think his punishment was satisfying.

 

  1. The quote that returns most frequently in the last chapters – at least as far I could see – is taken from Ecclesiastes (There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven . . . ) How did you feel about this use? Did you find it effective?

 

I found it downright creepy. Especially how it was used in the Mieze section, but also later on. Like an echo of evilness. It’s obviously not used in context. It’s one of those instances that made me want to read up on the book.

 

  1. Were you surprised by the ending?

 

I was surprised and somewhat disappointed. I’m not entirely sure what I expected but not this. First the episode in which Franz is catatonic, and at a mental institution and then picking up work, like everything that happened before didn’t take place. Possibly, Döblin wanted to tell us he redeemed himself. His love for Mieze, is certainly a redeeming factor.

 

  1. Looking back, what did you like the most about the book and what did you like the least?

 

At times I read it like a puzzle. Not the story itself, but the way Döblin used collage technique. Quoted songs, poems, the bible . . . It was fascinating to hunt them. Unfortunately, those were also the elements that I found annoying at times. There’s just too much and while it’s interesting to see what quotes he chose and how he changed parts of them, it made the book frustrating at times. It’s a book that requires close reading and I didn’t have the time to do that.

 

  1. Would you reread it and/ or are you glad you read Berlin Alexanderplatz?

 

My answer is a resounding no. I will definitely not read it again. I’m glad I read it. as I always felt I was missing out because I hadn’t read it yet. I found it intellectually stimulating but not exactly enjoyable. At other times in my life, the stimulating part would have been enough. Not so now. I didn’t realize before starting it that it’s so long. My edition has just 400 pages, but they are densely packed. The copies in translation showed that it was closer to 600.

8 thoughts on “Berlin Alexanderplatz Readalong – Part 4

  1. Very interesting posts on this book. You have made me want to read it. Based on what you wrote it sounds like the main character experienced something of a circle at the end. While changing characters are the norm, sometimes a kind of circular narrative is satisfying.

    • Thanks, Brian. I’d love to hear your thoughts. You’re right about the circle. I hadn’t seen it like that. Should you read it, plan a lot of time. And some secondary literature might be useful.

  2. Wait, no, some of us greatly enjoyed the “reading experience!” Some of us even enjoyed the novel.

    I guess I am not convinced that Franz moves in a circle, but the end is ambiguous. Have Franz’s terrible experiences changed him or not? Some language is direct – the old Franz is dead – but what does that mean when he seems to be walking around much like before.

    • I know you did and I’m very glad. I was looking forward to discussing it with you. Will visit your blog shortly. That said – I never hosted or cohosted a readalong during which so many people jumped ship. And not just because they found it difficult but because they hated it.

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